Happy National Quilting Day! Rising Star Variation Block.

To celebrate National Quilting Day I decided to put my spin on a block pattern I learned from the Missouri Star Quilt Company that they called the Rising Star.  After I made a test block based on their tutorial I decided I wanted to change some things to reduce some of the fabric bulk that occurred using their sewing and cutting techniques; plus make the center of the star different.

So here is my block which equals 6 1/2 inches by 6 1/2 inches square:

Rising Star

Which can be laid out like this to form a big star block that finishes at 12 1/2″ x 12 1/2″:

Rising Star Block

I’m working on designing a quilt with the star block which is still in progress, but here’s two examples of quilts you can make with the 6 1/2″ x 6 1/2″ block:

Using the Star layout:

Quilt Layout Example

Using a zig-zag type of layout:

Rising Star Block Variation

You can click HERE to learn how to make this block or go to my tutorials tab at the top of my site and look for Rising Star Variation.  Have fun!

Tutorial 2nd Version End-1

Fast Scrappy Four Patch Baby Quilt

This little quilt top came together really quickly by using a short-cut for making four patches.  I learned the technique a few years ago and thought I’d share it for those of you who need/want a fairly quick project.

To make the top exactly as pictured you only need one charm pack (pre-cut 5 inch squares) and a little white fabric and solid color fabric.

I actually only used 20 squares of patterned fabric from one Charm Pack (normally there’s 42 squares in each pack) then cut 20 more 5″ squares from different colored solid fabric that I thought would go well with the charm squares.  But you could certainly just use all squares from the charm pack and it would work just as well.  My personal preference was to break up some of the pattern with some solids.

The finished size for the pictured top is 40″ x 35 1/2″.

Click on this LINK to go to a step-by-step tutorial for how I made this quilt top (or click on my Tutorials tab at the top of the page).

My Other Passion

As you may tell from how the frequency of my posts and tutorials have declined, my other long-time passion has taken over a bit.  I got the opportunity to visit Alaska in June of this year and in the process of being excited about taking pictures of that beautiful state, my somewhat dormant passion for photography resurfaced (click on the photo to see it larger).

Reflections on Otter Lake-1

So I joined a local photography club to help pull me out of the house and give me inspiration.  I also decided I would start putting a portfolio together and offer photos for sale.  Right now my interests are very diverse, but I think I will soon land on subject matter and/or techniques that will become my personal style.  I will definitely be seeking out opportunities to add photos of quilts I discover whether at a quilt show, antique malls, flea markets, wherever, to my blog.  I also plan on doing a series of photographs on “hand-made” items to add to my portfolio.

The photos below are of some antique quilts I recently came across while wandering through an antique mall.Antique Quilt-1

3 Quilts-1

So if you have an interest in looking at what I have on my photography website, just click on the link I’ve added to the sidebar of this blog.  If you would like to purchase something on that site I have made a special 20% off discount coupon code on the price of a print for my followers to use.  Just join the e-mail list on my photography website and I’ll send you a coupon.  This is not applied to any frames, etc. if chosen.  Just the print itself.

When you click on one of the images on the site it will show you the different options for printing and the prices.  Thanks in advance, even if you just visit to take a look!  I’ll be adding a lot of new photos in the coming weeks.

Right now I’m in the process of writing a tutorial on how to make a quick, fun, scrappy four patch baby quilt (which of course can be used for any size quilt by adding more four patches).  Look for that to be posted within the next two weeks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accidental Quilt Block Variation – REDO 2015

I have received some requests to write out a step-by-step tutorial for the variation of the block I made in my posting titled Re-thinking My Accidental Quilt Block from January 19, 2014. Because I just showed various pictures, folks trying to make the block became confused. I don’t blame them!

However, as I was preparing the re-write, I also remembered that I had wanted to try another variation, because the one in the Jan 2014 post ended up having a lot of seams to contend with. So I tried the new variation and LOVE it. It is way easier to make, so I’m posting a tutorial on how to make that one instead. I think everyone will be happy that I did, LOL.

Pictured below is a new sample block and two potential layouts that could be used for a quilt. You may notice the colors changed in the quilt layout samples because I didn’t realize I was low on the fabric I used for the block sample. :)  To cut my pieces I used 2 ½” wide strips from a Jelly Roll which resulted in a block that equaled 6 ½” square.Block Pieces-9

Block Pieces-10

Block Pieces-11

Click on this link to get to the tutorial, or just click on my Tutorials link at the top of the page. Look for the Accidental Quilt Block Variation – 2015.

Sorry I’ve Been Absent – But New Pattern to Come!

I have woefully neglected the blog due to several commitments that have kept me away.  One of which included a quilt I’m about to finish as a gift to someone.  However since I over-bought the fabric I needed for the quilt design she chose, an idea for another quilt using the leftover fabric has emerged.  I will be posting that soon so hang in there!

 

 

Part 3 – Deconstructing my Friendship Star Quilt – Lessons Learned

I have been sick with a nasty virus folks, so my brain hasn’t been available to add part three of my posting.  But antibiotics finally kicked in and I’m starting to function again, so on to the last posting on the quilting and binding of my Friendship Star quilt.

First, I want to talk about my challenge doing machine applique on the inside curves of a circle cut into the center of a rectangle block.

Now I’m no expert at applique in the first place; only doing it twice before and only on the outer edges of circles.  So wrapping my mind around sewing down the inner edges of a circle cut into a rectangle was a bit challenging for some reason!  You can see the “messy” result below.

Friendship Star 2

Plus, my sewing machine allows me to choose “applique” stitches. The one above may also be known as a “blanket stitch” on other machines.  My machine also allows me to do “mirror images” of stitches, so basically, I could choose the blanket stitch that makes a stitch falling to the left, reverse that and make the stitch fall to the right or vice-verse just by pressing a button.  That makes life pretty simple,  huh?

Machine Setting for Applique

However I think I really just went too fast and lost control of my curves.  I ended up missing some stitches and had to go around a second time.  The stitches ended up looking more like a sunburst, with lines going out in random different angles instead of clean, more exact stitches as you would  normally see on an outside curve.  In the end, I was okay with this and considered it a “design element”, LOL.

However I just had to try it again on another sample after I had finished my quilt, which actually turned out better.  So again, the key is keep your needle as close to the inside edge as possible, go slow, stopping after two or three stitches then lifting your presser foot to readjust the position of your block so you can keep moving around the curve.

Inner Circle Example

The one above turned out better than the one in the quilt itself🙂.

Machine Binding a Quilt

I am not the best at hand sewing so I have always sewn my bindings on by machine.  There are several good tutorials on how to do that, but I recently came across a new one that I tried and liked the result better than what I had been doing.

Normally, I was sewing the binding to the BACK of my quilt first, then to the front.  This time I sewed it to the FRONT of the quilt first, and liked that even more.  However, you have to feel VERY confident that you can sense, or feel where the folded over edge of the binding is falling in relation to the binding on the front (it has to fall past the stitching on the back) to know you are not accidentally sewing a very wonky seam or sewing into the front of the binding.  It’s kind of scary because you can’t see whats happening on the front, but I found I could actually feel where I was and didn’t mess this up.  Plus, if you are using a color of thread that matches the front of your quilt, it’s probably less scary. Here’s a link to an excellent tutorial on the Cluck Cluck Sew blog, a wonderful blog with great information and inspiration.

I always use 2 1/2″ strips for my binding. Below is a sample of what mine looked like.  Because I already had some straight stitching in the border, this additional line of stitching did not look out of place in my opinion.  So part of making the decision to bind in this manner might depend on what else is going on in your front borders, or the color of your thread and how much it might stand out.

Binding example

So that’s it for deconstructing this quilt to provide a little insight on my thought process behind designing and quilting this project.  I hope it may give you some ideas and tips as well.

 

 

 

 

Part 2 – Deconstructing My Friendship Star Quilt – Lessons Learned

Part 2 on this topic is to discuss the center section of this quilt and my thought process for the quilting.

Center Section

Quilting Diagonal Lines

Let’s start with the center star block first.  I decided I wanted to straight line quilt on the diagonal to add some interest. I think you can tell how that turned out in the photo below.

Diagonal Example

I laid out my starting line with a piece of painters tape in the center of my block.  But I didn’t assume if I put the tape there it would line up well with the diagonal slant of the star points.

Diagonal Tape

So I took a long ruler and lined it up with the diagonal lines of the star points to see if the tape edge lined up correctly as well. I didn’t want the stitch line to be at a weird angle compared to the angle of the star points.  I would notice it even if others did not, LOL.

Horizontal stitching ruler

In this case the tape line actually was a tad off so I slide the ruler down so that the edge was close to the center but a line was still lined up with a star point angle, and adjusted the tape along the edge of the ruler.  That made me happy.

Lesson Learned:  I could have just done that first rather than checking to see if the tape lined up after I placed it, (palm bump to forehead).

Once I had my tape adjusted I lined up the edge of the foot and started sewing.  This meant that I did not have a stitch line that ran smack down the center of the block, since my stitch line wouldn’t have lined up exactly from corner to corner anyway.  I thought it looked fine IMO.

Once that base line was sewn I lined up the edge of my foot with it and sewed the next line of stitching, and continued on lining up my foot with each subsequent stitch line.  I sewed one half of the block first, then sewed the other half, moving away from the center, again so that I could make sure I was smoothing the fabric equally in both directions as needed.

Diagonal Tape 2

Echo Quilting Around Circles

After the center block was done it was time to do the two flanking blocks.  I decided to sew vertical lines in those blocks but to “echo” the outside edges of the circles.

Friend Star 4 curve

To accomplish that I again went to my long ruler and laid it over the circles.  I followed the half-inch marks from the approximate center of one circle to the approximate center of the other circle to be sure the distance between the lines worked out okay.  I then marked where I was going to start and end my vertical stitching lines with that trusty painters tape again.

Circle 1

I then chose what I considered the starter line then added longer pieces of the tape to the little one to run the tape from top to bottom of the block.  I left the other piece of tape in place as well so that I knew where I wanted to stop.

Circle 2

I sewed all of the center vertical lines first, running them through one half of each circle.  Then for the second half of the circles I stopped my foot with the needle 1/2″ from the edge of the circle.

Circle 3

I’m fortunate enough that my foot has two marks on it; one that is 1/4″ away from the needle and another that is 1/2″ away from the needle.  So I can tell where I need to stop.  If you don’t have a mark on your foot you can mark it yourself with a Sharpie (if you want it to be permanent) or a piece of tape.

Also note – since this is a curved edge both marked lines on your foot will not touch the edge at the same time!  The first line to touch the edge is when you stop.  In the photo above that would be the line on the left edge of the foot.

Foot Edge

After I stopped at the edge, with my needle down I pivoted to place the edge of my foot on the edge of the circle, then slowly sewed following along the edge.  When I come to the previously sewn vertical line I stopped 1/2″ away so I can again pivot and line up my foot edge to follow the sewn vertical line to the bottom of the block.

Circle 4

Just keep following your curved lines this same way until you have to stop to avoid crossing over into another block. When you approach the border, or edge of your block you can simply stop your sewing line, cut your threads, then start back up at the bottom half of the curve or stitch in the ditch along the straight seam then pick up the curves again at the bottom.

Friend Star 4 curve

If your last stitched vertical line is a little more or a little less than 1/2″ from the side or border of your block, I don’t feel it really matters.  Just stop stitching when you think it looks good!  In some cases I think mine ended up being just a tad thinner than 1/2″ but I preferred that more than a larger gap between the last line and the side seam/border.  Personal preference rules here.

I hope sharing this process helps you to decide if you want to tackle echoing a curve within a quilt.

My next posting will talk about how I did the machine appliqué  on the inside curves of a cut-out circle, and machine binding.